The Occupy Movements in Taiwan Which Western Media Refuses to Cover

This is a short overview of the various occupy movements that have occupied and protested peacefully outside the Taiwanese parliament that have received little to not coverage from the western media, especially when compared to the anti-Chinese Sunflower movement.

800 Warriors16938626_779606775521606_3562475856847108694_n.jpg

16903590_781497511999199_8706247145119418627_o.jpg

An assortment of retired police officers and firefighters who are protesting against the substantial pension cuts that President Tsai Ing-Wen are trying to push through. Over 100 000 people marches against Tsai’s government in March.

They are named after the 800 soldiers who famously defended the Sihang Warehouse against overwhelming Japanese forces in World War 2.

Taiwanese Indigenous Groups

17156001_811723345647253_1415085425855624146_n

17190546_812228002263454_6209742105766026874_n

Taiwanese indigenous  people led by community leaders such as Mayaw Biho and Panai fighting for the land rights of their people. Many natives were evicted from their homes during the Japanese occupation and have yet to regain these sacred land, the indigenous people want Tsai to stop talking with her mouth and to take action instead by returning this land.

Permanent Peace and Development Association
13507150_1034123063350734_7606104899165445846_n.jpg

A group looking to reform the Republic of China’s consitution through ideas such as electoral reform as well as changing the 92 consensus. They ultimately want to pursue a goal of ‘permanent peace’ by re-uniting or adhering to more to the mainland. Much of their ideology is based on PRC Xi’s call to for global unity.  They hope to make Taiwan a shining example of liberalism and spread it to the mainland after uniting.

 

 

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s